Artikel

4 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

From Financial Times

On the 14th floor of Malaysia’s parliament building – a white, honeycombed 1960s box on the Kuala Lumpur skyline – Anwar Ibrahim speaks quietly for a man known domestically as a populist firebrand.
Talk of a general election in the next few months is in the air, on local blogs and even between the lines of the pro-government media, although Najib Razak, the prime minister, could wait until next April.

“This will be a different election,” Malaysia’s opposition leader promises, dressed in a subdued blue suit and tie. “We are changing the entire political landscape of the country. I think a growing number, particularly the younger Malaysians, want Malaysia to evolve as a mature, vibrant democracy.”

What many younger Malaysians want was on vivid display two months ago, when tens of thousands of demonstrators took to central Kuala Lumpur in a rally organised by Bersih, an opposition-linked civil society group pushing for electoral reform.

The protest ended violently after demonstrators were dispersed by police using water cannon and teargas.

It was a surprisingly strong showing of popular frustration and also placed Mr Anwar yet again into an uncomfortable spotlight, only months after his acquittal on sodomy charges – the latest chapter in a turbulent political career that has taken him from deputy prime minister and anointed leader-in-waiting in the late 1990s to prison, the formation of a political party and back into parliament.

Video taken at the demonstration by Bersih – Malay for “clean” – showed him gesturing to the crowd, leading the attorney-general to charge that he had been encouraging demonstrators to breach a barricade and enter a square where public protests are banned.

“Really flimsy,” Mr Anwar says of the charge, repeating the gesture by rolling one hand over another. “Look at it clearly in the point of law, what is the evidence?”

Mr Anwar’s supporters see this as another government-inspired ploy – just like the most recent sodomy charge – to keep him off the campaign trail.

The election will be close. It was at the hands of Mr Anwar’s People’s Alliance that the ruling coalition, dominated by the United Malay National Organisation (Umno), lost a two-thirds majority in parliament in 2008 – a shock for a party that has ruled Malaysia since independence.

“The next election will be the most competitive in [the] history of Malaysia,” says Bridget Welsh, an expert in Malaysian affairs at Singapore Management University. “The opposition, while facing problems internally and its own trust deficit, has gained support by moving from problem raising toward gaining experience at the state level in government offering more options for Malaysians.”

Now 65, Mr Anwar admits this is “probably” his last shot at becoming prime minister. He seems tired for a man facing his best shot yet of governing the country’s complex mix of 28m Malays, Chinese and Indians.

“We present our manifesto, our policies and, of course, if I get a mandate, I continue, otherwise I think I’ll go back to teaching,” Mr Anwar says.

Six years in jail on sodomy charges have taken their toll. Another cat and mouse game with Malaysia’s judiciary looks likely, thanks to his hand gestures at the bersih rally. On Monday, a judge set a date in September for hearing an application by Mr Anwar’s lawyers to dismiss the charge.

Yet he perks up when asked to rate the Najib administration’s record.
Two years ago the prime minister rolled out a vast “economic transformation programme” to more than double per capita income to $15,000 by 2020. The ruling coalition says it has created over 3.3m jobs and has been accompanied by a billboard campaign for multi-ethnic co-operation, known as “1Malaysia”.

“You talk about ‘1Malaysia’, but the race divide now is worse than before,” says Mr Anwar. “Who would question the whole spirit of Malaysia? We don’t. But the action [of the government] is something else.”

Mr Anwar’s supporters say he is one of the few whose agenda can pull together the country’s complex ethnic patchwork. Yet critics say his challenge in power would be holding together his own coalition of the ethnic Chinese Democratic Action Party, his own Parti Keadilan Rakyat and the Islamist Parti Islam Malaysia.

“This is not a coalition based on just flimsy deals,” he insists. “We actually crafted clear policies. There may be some minor issues that we could argue on, even within one party, or one race. But with the substantive issues, no.”

As he leaves his office the opposition’s best hope for power seems more energised. But the fact that his office is devoid of any decoration, and his desk is empty, reveals how pressured he remains.

“We don’t keep papers here because there’s no security here as far as we are concerned. I don’t leave anything here. It’s not good,” Mr Anwar says, quietly again. “But then that’s how we have to survive.”

4 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

KeadilanDaily

Penghakiman bertulis berhubung kes Fitnah II melibatkan Ketua Umum KEADILAN, Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim adalah bukti jelas  menunjukkan tuduhan tersebut hanya fitnah jahat didalangi Umno.

“Penghakiman itu selari dengan pendirian kita yang menyatakan sememangnya itu merupakan satu fitnah,” kata Naib Presiden KEADILAN, N Surendran.

Beliau mengulas penghakiman bertulis oleh Hakim Mahkamah Tinggi, Datuk Mohamad Zabidin Mohd Diah dalam perbicaraan kes Fitnah II Anwar yang mendapati mahkamah tidak boleh yakin sepenuhnya berhubung integriti sampel yang diambil untuk ujian DNA daripada pengadu, Mohd Saiful Bukhari Azlan.

“Justeru, saya menuntut agar kes rayuan oleh Peguam Negara digugurkan segera kerana kes tersebut tiada bukti,” tegasnya.

Surendran juga menggesa Perdana Menteri, Datuk Seri Najib Razak berhenti menggunakan polis dan badan kehakiman sebagai medium untuk menjatuhkan Anwar yang juga Ketua Pembangkang.

“Najib harus berlawan secara adil, gunakan debat dan sebagainya, bukan melalui cara salah dan jahat,” kata Surendran lagi.

Dalam penghakiman bertulis 80 muka surat oleh Zabidin semalam, beliau menyatakan mahkamah tidak ada keterangan untuk menyokong tuduhan Saiful yang kononnya ada berlaku penetrasi.

“Ini adalah satu kesalahan seksual, ia adalah undang-undang lapuk yang mahkamah sentiasa enggan untuk mensabitkan orang yang dituduh semata-mata atas keterangan pengadu (Mohd Saiful) yang tidak disokong.

“Oleh itu, tertuduh dilepas dan dibebaskan daripada pertuduhan,” kata Zabidin dalam penghakiman itu.

Pada 9 Januari lepas, Zabidin membebaskan dan melepaskan Anwar daripada tuduhan fitnah bekas pembantunya, Saiful hasil ciptaan kerajaan Umno BN

4 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

Merdeka Rakyat
6 Julai 2012 (Jumaat)

1) 7.15 mlm – Solat & Tazkirah Maghrib
Lokasi: Masjid At – Taqwa, Jalan 11C, Selayang Baru

2) 7.30 – 12.00 mlm – Majlis Jamuan Makan Malam
Lokasi: Dewan SJKC San Yuk, Kampong Kenanga, Rawang

Penceramah:

i. YB Dato’ Seri Anwar Ibrahim
ii. YB Dr Tan Seng Giaw
iii. YB William Leong Jee Keen
iv. YB Khalid Samad
v. YB Tian Chua
vi. YB Gan Pee Nee
vii. YB Dr Xavier Jayakumar

3) 9.00 – 12.00 mlm – Ceramah Perdana – Merdeka Rakyat
Lokasi: Padang Kampong Selayang Indah, Selayang Baru
(Belakang NSK Selayang)

Penceramah:

i. YB Dato’ Seri Anwar Ibrahim
ii. YBhg Mat Sabu
iii. YB Sivanesan
iv. YB Tian Chua
v. YB William Leong Jee Keen
vi. YBhg Mohamad Abdul Rahman

4 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

In the final episode, Julian Assange talks to Malaysia’s opposition leader, who faced prison terms twice in what he calls politically-motivated cases. But he never gave up fighting for democracy in a country he brands less democratic than even Myanmar.

Klik here to Watch the full new episode of The Julian Assange Show exclusively on RT. 

When Anwar Ibrahim, the former deputy prime minister of Malaysia and currently leader of the opposition party, says democracy, he means “an independent judiciary, free media and an economic policy that can promote growth and the market economy.”

However, at the same time, he told Assange that the people of Malaysia should understand what abuses all these elements of freedom may bring to their country.

“Arab Spring – one area clambering for freedom. Then we have Occupy Wall Street… and the limitations, the unbridled greed and the gap between the very rich and very poor, the complicity between the big business groups and politics – these we need to avoid,” Ibrahim says.

 

From prison to parliament

Nowadays Ibrahim’s opposition political party is gaining more and more support from the people. However, before his voice was heard, he went through six years in solitary confinement in prison and two criminal cases.

Ibrahim was first arrested for supporting land farmers in the north and demanding better treatment from the government. As a result he spent two years in detention without trial.

The activist was released after Mahathir Mohamad became prime minister, whose reforms he supported. He even became his deputy.

But in 1998 Ibrahim was imprisoned for six years ‘for corruption and sodomy’ after he fell out with his boss.

He was released in 2004 largely thanks to campaigning by his wife. Thousands of people went into the streets in his support.

In 2008, a significant year for Malaysian politics, Ibrahim tried to get elected to parliament. He maintains this was a real challenge because his opposition party was not given even a minute of air-time.

“We won 10 out of 11 parliamentary seats, and so I believe we are ripe for some sort of Malaysian Spring through the electoral process,” he says.

And despite the fresh allegations of sexual harassment he faced in 2008 and the abuse he suffered on a daily basis at the hands of the national media, his party gained more support from people.

In January 2012 he won the case. But with Malaysian elections looming and Anwar tipped to win, he has recently been charged with unauthorized assembly.

On Monday he faced fresh charges over his part in a mass rally for electoral reforms.

If he is found guilty, Anwar might be sentenced to up to two years in prison and a fine. This will mean that he could be disqualified from standing in elections.

3 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

Link: http://www.rt.com/news/assange-show-malaysia-democracy-221/

Julian Assange talks to Malaysia’s main opposition leader, who twice served terms in prison after what he calls politically-motivated criminal cases. But he keeps fighting for democracy in a country he brands less democratic than even Burma.

When Anwar Ibrahim, the former deputy prime minister of Malaysia and currently leader of the opposition party, says democracy, he means “an independent judiciary, free media and an economic policy that can promote growth and the market economy.”

However, at the same time, he told Assange that the people of Malaysia should understand what abuses all these elements of freedom may bring to their country.

“Arab Spring – one area clambering for freedom. Then we have Occupy Wall Street… and the limitations, the unbridled greed and the gap between the very rich and very poor, the complicity between the big business groups and politics – these we need to avoid,” Ibrahim says.

From prison to parliament

Nowadays Ibrahim’s opposition political party is gaining more and more support from the people. However, before his voice was heard, he went through six years in solitary confinement in prison and two criminal cases.

Ibrahim was first arrested for supporting land farmers in the north and demanding better treatment from the government. As a result he spent two years in detention without trial.

The activist was released after Mahathir Mohamad became prime minister, whose reforms he supported. He even became his deputy.

But in 1998 Ibrahim was imprisoned for six years ‘for corruption and sodomy’ after he fell out with his boss.

He was released in 2004 largely thanks to campaigning by his wife. Thousands of people went into the streets in his support.

In 2008, a significant year for Malaysian politics, Ibrahim tried to get elected to parliament. He maintains this was a real challenge because his opposition party was not given even a minute of air-time.

“We won 10 out of 11 parliamentary seats, and so I believe we are ripe for some sort of Malaysian Spring through the electoral process,” he says.

And despite the fresh allegations of sexual harassment he faced in 2008 and the abuse he suffered on a daily basis at the hands of the national media, his party gained more support from people.

In January 2012 he won the case. But with Malaysian elections looming and Anwar tipped to win, he has recently been charged with unauthorized assembly.

On Monday he faced fresh charges over his part in a mass rally for electoral reforms.
If he is found guilty, Anwar might be sentenced to up to two years in prison and a fine. This will mean that he could be disqualified from standing in elections.

Watch Anwar Ibrahim talking about Malaysian politics, opposition and his country’s future in the latest episode of The Julian Assange Show, exclusively on RT, starting Tuesday, 11:30 GMT.

2 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

Harakah

Isteri kepada tahanan Akta Keselamatan Dalam Negeri (ISA), Razali Kassan sedih dan kecewa apabila suaminya diseksa di Kem Tahanan Kamunting (Kemta) walaupun ahli keluarga mengikut arahan pihak berkuasa sebelum ini.

Nunurheni Onim berkata, sebelum ini beliau dan ahli keluarga yang lain tidak bercerita mengenai penahanan suaminya kepada mana-mana pihak kerana berpegang kepada janji pihak polis.

Pihak polis Bukit Aman katanya melarang beliau menghebahkan penahanan suaminya di bawah ISA kepada media, peguam atau badan bukan kerajaan (NGO) jika mahu Razali dibebaskan segera.

“Sebelum ini saya diarahkan oleh pihak polis untuk tidak bercerita kepada peguam atau mana-mana pihak.

“Mereka kata kalau saya tak hebahkan penahanan suami saya kepada sesiapa, suami saya tidak akan diapa-apakan. Saya pegang janji mereka tapi sekarang suami saya belum dibebaskan malah dipukul dengan teruk,” adu beliau di hadapan Pesuruhjaya Hak Asasi Manusia Malaysia (Suhakam), Muhammad Sha’ani Abdullah.

Nunurheni hadir bersama-sama Gerakan Mansuhkan ISA (GMI) ke Suhakam hari ini bagi menyerahkan memorandum mengenai seksaan pihak Kemta terhadap tahanan yang melakukan mogok lapar, menuntut pembebasan segera.

Dalam aduan kepada Suhakam tadi, Sekretariat GMI, Syukri Razab berkata, seorang lagi tahanan, Mustawan Ahbab menceritakan bahawa Razali ditumbuk, diterajang dan diludah di muka oleh pegawai Kemta kerana melancarkan mogok lapar dan menyusahkan warden Kemta.

Menurutnya, Razali tetap dikasari oleh pegawai Kemta meskipun beliau seorang tahanan yang baik dan tidak melawan.

Memorandum itu selepas GMI mengiringi lawatan tiga keluarga tahanan ISA di Kemta semalam.

Selain isteri Razali, isteri kepada Mustawan Ahbab, Khairunizah Mohd Akhir dan juga bapa kepada Fadzullah, Abdul Razak Mohd serta isteri tahanan warga Sri Lanka, Anthony turut menyertai lawatan tersebut.

Razali kelihatan lemah dan mengakui dipukul dalam pertemuan tersebut.

Sementara itu, Khairunizah dalam aduannya pula memberitahu, tempoh pertemuan beliau dan Mustawan dipendekkan daripada satu jam kepada 25 minit sebagai denda kerana Mustawan membocorkan maklumat tahanan kepada beliau melalui telefon.

“Dalam kad kuning Kemta, saya boleh bertemu selama 45 minit dan kalau memaklumkan awal kepada pihak Kemta, boleh berjumpa sejam. Tapi bermula semalam, saya hanya dibenarkan bertemu selama 25 minit sahaja sebagai denda kepada Mustawan. Tak berbaloi saya datang dari jauh untuk pertemuan sesingkat itu,” katanya.

Tempoh pertemuan keluarga dan tahanan yang mogok lapar juga turut dipendekkan dari satu jam kepada setengah jam.

Suhakam atur lawatan ke Kemta

Sha’ani dalam responsnya berkata, pihak Suhakam akan mengatur lawatan segera ke Kemta dan membawa doktor bagi memeriksa keadaan tahanan khususnya peserta mogok lapar yang masuk hari ke-12.

“Suhakam memandang berat kes pihak berkuasa mengenakan tindakan di luar batasan kepada tahanan. Mogok lapar dilakukan oleh pihak yang ditindas, yang tidak diberi peluang membela diri di mahkamah.

“Warden kata tindakan mogok lapar menyuahkan mereka, kalau susah jangan jadi warden. Itu tanggungjawab warden, bukan guna kuasa untuk tekan orang di bawah. Mereka harus menghormati hak asasi tahanan sebagai manusia,” katanya.

Tegasnya juga, kerajaan seharusnya menghormati semua pihak termasuk peguam yang menjalankan tugas mereka.

“Kerajaan seharusnya menghormati pihak lain termasuk peguam. Pegawai Kemta pula harus bersikap berkecuali, hormati hak tahanan bertemu keluarga dan peguam,” katanya.

2 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

From Malaysia Chronicle
By Christopher Fernandez

Abdul Razak Baginda, a controversial figure in the death of Mongolian translator Altantuya Shaaribu, was the chairman of the Kendo Club at St John’s Institution in 1978, while the vice-chairman was none other than me.

Baginda was a most affable chap back in school those days. He was pleasant, courteous and gregarious. He had many friends as he was a likeable person. There were none in school who could be said to be enemies with him.

Upon leaving St John’s, we parted ways and he never crossed my mind, until a chance encounter at the MPH Bangsar in Jalan Telawi brought us back into contact. By then he was a familiar personality among Malaysians as a television talk show host.

During that brief encounter, he invited me to be a contributing editor with a publication he was about to start from scratch. The name of the publication was Asian Editor. This was mid-1997 and Baginda had a business office at Wisma Getah Asli in Jalan Ampang, Kuala Lumpur which was frequented by me in the process of writing stories for them.

When the official launch of the magazine was held at a leading hotel in the city, it was none other than Najib Tun Razak, who was to officiate at the launching ceremony. Unfortunately, and for certain reasons, Najib did not show up. This was really the old boy network of St.John’s at work as Najib himself is an old boy of St. John’s, but much senior to both of us, Baginda himself being two years my senior.

But the show went on with Baginda apologizing about the non-appearance of Najib and the maiden issue of Asian Editor was unveiled with Baginda hailing the “editorial prowess” of the team. It was a magazine meant to be circulated and distributed around the Asian region.

Unfortunately, while being a commendable effort, the magazine folded suddenly after a year-and-a half of publishing. No reasons given, but all the staff working on the magazine were paid their dues before parting ways with Baginda.

While on the job at Asian Editor, there was hardly anything amiss at the office. Baginda was as he always was, almost as if we were in school. He was his usual cheerful, confident self, though most of us felt he had very little business acumen especially with regards to publishing. It also looked as if he had very little real interest in the publication, leaving day-to-day operations to us.

Imagine the way and manner in which we were shocked out of our wits to discover that a political analyst was to be charged with the murder of a Mongolian national and that it was none other than Abdul Razak Baginda.

What was their motive

In the initial furor surrounding his arrest and subsequent remand for a period of twenty-two months, we were all hopeful that this was some big foul up and that Baginda will be spared the gallows.

But the curious twists and turns during the trial left many of us who were following the proceedings very much puzzled and bewildered, and when eventually two policemen were charged with the murder of Altantuya all of us were relieved on one hand for Baginda, yet had more unanswered questions on our minds.

Perhaps the most glaring and evident question was put forward by Mr Karpal Singh, counsel for Sharibuu Setev, who was holding a watching brief on behalf of the family: “What was their motive?”

This is precisely the question which is uppermost in most people’s minds? Why would two policemen who did not know Altantuya from Adam’s to apples, why would they want to go to the extent to gag and bind her and blow her up with explosives? Why on earth?

These were two men who were certainly not deranged and thereafter the whole mystery of the death of Altantuya began to shroud the nation of Malaysia with more and more questions and twists and turns.

It went into a never ending saga with witnesses appearing and disappearing and testimonies given turned into an almost opposite version and even a statutory declaration rescinded.

No closure until the truth comes out

Since the news broke of the brutal murder of Altantuya, Malaysians have been gripped by the wide ranging implications that have been created by this young Mongolian woman upon the hearts and minds of Malaysians.

While Altantuya was never much a part of the local scene, the others who are implicated and linked to her murder and the corruption scandal surrounding the Scorpene submarine procurement by the Malaysian government are noted persons in the country which have started to give Malaysians goose bumps and maybe sleepless nights.

The death of Altantuya is beginning to start to get eerie and spooky for most Malaysians. It’s as if it is set to haunt us, that this nation has been befallen a curse by her untimely and mysterious death.

It is not only an issue that troubles the minds and hearts of Malaysians but is beginning to rise up to the forefront of the international community.

The answers are there and it should be that the relevant authorities from the various countries involved, Malaysia, France, Mongolia and even Interpol work together to bring closure once and for all for everyone’s minds and hearts to be put at ease.

It is definitely a time for closure and also a time to bury the ghost of Altantuya and for Malaysians to move on with their lives. Only a once and for all settlement that appeases all parties with a vested interest in her death will bury the ghost of Altantuya forever. Prime Minister Najib Razak must take the lead in ensuring the truth comes out.

2 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

The Economic Times

KUALA LUMPUR: State-owned oil company Petronas is tired of being Malaysia’s cash trough. Its growing pique at the government flared into public view in early June at the World Gas Conference.

Chief executive Shamsul Azhar Abbas took to the stage and declared that the government’s policy of subsidising fuel was plain wrong. A murmur ran through the crowd – his boss, Prime Minister Najib Razak, was sitting in the front row.

Moments later, Najib went to the podium himself to remind everybody that the subsidies – for which Petronas foots the bill – have “social-economic objectives.”

The subtext of that rejoinder: Malaysians pay among the lowest electricity rates and petrol-pump prices in Asia. While the government has vowed to “rationalize” that, it’s highly unlikely to happen before elections expected in a few months.

The polite but pointed disagreement was the latest sign of assertiveness from an oil company that prime ministers have treated as a piggy bank for pet projects since it was established in 1974.

Interviews with current and former officials and an examination of Petronas and government documents show that strains have been building behind the scenes over how much money the company hands over to the government in the form of fuel subsidies, dividends and taxes.

Financial data reviewed by Reuters show the government has increasingly relied on Petronas’s payments – a “dividend” to its sole shareholder – to plug fiscal deficits that have begun to alarm ratings agencies and analysts.

The data also show these payments grew over the past several years as oil prices soared, along with government spending. But Malaysia’s official accounts do not show how the money is being spent – and the government has steadfastly refused to disclose any details about that.

“WE NEED CASH” Petronas is Malaysia’s largest single taxpayer and biggest source of revenue, covering as much as 45 per cent of the government’s budget. Unlike other oil-rich nations such as Saudi Arabia, Norway or Brazil, Malaysia runs chronic, large budget deficits that have expanded even as oil revenues increased. Last year’s fiscal gap, at 5 per cent of gross domestic product, trailed only India’s for the dubious distinction of biggest in emerging Asia, and it may widen this year.

Subsidies account for a big chunk of the deficit. They have other downsides as well, Shamsul noted in his speech to the gas conference. “Subsidies distort transparency, reduce competition and deter new investments,” he said, adding that Petronas paid between 18 billion and 20 billion ringgit ($5.75-6.35 billion) a year to subsidize gas consumption.

Malaysia isn’t facing a fiscal crisis. Foreign investors eagerly buy Malaysian government bonds, confident the country’s reserves of oil, gas and foreign currency are deep enough to ensure the debt will be repaid.

That faith will be tested over the next few months. Falling oil and gas prices will likely constrain Petronas’s 2012 profits, and a worsening euro-zone crisis may hurt the country’s exports. Smaller Petronas payouts and slowing economic growth would pinch government finances.

Shamsul argues now is an opportune time to pursue foreign acquisitions on the cheap as Malaysia’s domestic energy supplies deplete. On Thursday, the company announced it was acquiring its Canadian joint-venture partner, Progress Energy Resources Corp, for $4.7 billion. More may be in the offing.

“Mind you, for that to happen, we need cash,” Shamsul said in his speech.

The trouble is, the government needs the cash, too.

2 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

Malaysiakini

Opposition Leader Anwar Ibrahim and two other PKR leaders have been slapped with an additional charge of abetment for their alleged involvement in the breaking the barricades at the Bersih 3.0 rally.

The new charge is the third levelled against the trio, who were initially charged for participating in an illegal rally and violating a court order.

Anwar and the other two PKR leaders – deputy president Azmin Ali and former PKR supreme council member Badrul Hisham Shaharin – are among first to be charged under the recently-passed Peaceful Assembly Act.

On May 22, the three were charged under section 4(2)©) of the new law for participating in the rally and violating a court order between 2.30pm and 3pm on April 28.

The court order, which magistrate Zaki Asyraf Zubir had signed on April 26, prohibited the mammoth gathering at Dataran Merdeka and the area between Jalan Sultan Hishammuddin, Jalan Raja and Jalan Kelab.

If found guilty, they are liable to a maximum fine of RM10,000. Anwar and Azmin could lose their status as elected representatives if their fine exceeds RM2,000.

They also faced a second charge under section 188 of the Penal Code in that they allegedly breached a magistrate’s order.

They are also said to have conspired with Rasah PKR division deputy head R Tangam, lawyer G Rajesh Kumar and van driver Farhan Ibrahim @ Alias by inciting them to breach the barricade surrounding Dataran Merdeka, which ‘could have caused a riot or clashes’.

If convicted, they are liable to a maximum jail term of a month or fine of RM2,000, or both.

The three pleaded not guilty to the three charges.

In an immediate reaction, an angry Anwar said this was yet another of political persecution.

The court has set Sept 3 for mention.

1 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

Malaysiakini

The government should shut down the detention camp in Kamunting and convert it into a national heritage site, urged anti-ISA group Gabungan Mansuhkan ISA (GMI), in announcing three demands last night.

GMI secretariat member Ahmad Syukri Razab also called on the police to immediately release the last 45 detainees held there under the Internal Security Act (ISA), as the law replacing it has come into force.

He also demanded that the government to set up an independent commission to investigate the purported torture of the detainees.

Ahmad was speaking at the group’s candlelight vigil near the national police headquarters at Bukit Aman.

“(Kamunting camp) is a monument for us to remember that we have been oppressed before,” he said, explaining why he felt the infamous detention centre should be gazetted as a historical landmark.

Syukri announced these demands before a crowd of 30 people at the vigil, who displayed placards that read among others ‘10th day of hunger strike’, ‘Hunger strike for dignity’, Why torture the detainees?’

Under the close watch of some 30 police personnel, the group chanted anti-ISA slogans, recited poems and invited the family members of ISA detainees to relate their experiences.

GMI chairman Syed Ibrahim Syed Nor urged Home Minister Hishammuddin Hussein to release the last 45 detainees as he has the power to do so.

He pointed out that under Section 32(2) of the Security Offences (special measures) Bill 2012, the ISA detainees could be further detained until the detention period is served, unless the home minister intervenes.

“The minister can order the release of the detainees if he is satisfied. We urge Hishammuddin to exercise his power because it is the right thing to do,” he said.

Son missed

Meanwhile, Hadijah Veerabu, whose son Fadzullah Abdul Razak has been held in Kamunting since 2010, said she missed her son very much adding has been losing weight since the day her son was taken away.

“Now he is in the tenth day of the hunger strike and my body hurts for him,” she said.

Hadijah added she had lost faith in Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak, who promised to abolish the ISA but did not bring Fadzullah back to her.

“Whenever I ask camp officials when my son can be released, they tell me to ask Najib,” she said.

GMI said they will continue to pressure the authorities, while the activists and the family members of the detainees are expected to visit Kamunting today.

1 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

 KeadilanDaily

Keengganan Perdana Menteri, Datuk Seri Najib Razak menjadi saksi dalam kes Scorpene di Mahkamah Perancis menimbulkan prejudis di kalangan rakyat, kata Ketua Pembangkang, Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim.

Menurut Anwar, Najib sepatutnya mempunyai keberanian untuk hadir pada perbicaraan itu bagi membersihkan namanya sejak didakwa terlibat dengan skandal berkenaan.

“Keengganan beliau hadir bukan saja menimbulkan prejudis dan prasangka di kalangan rakyat, sebaliknya dunia juga sedang melihat setakat mana keberanian  dan kebenaran yang cuba ditegakkan oleh beliau,

“Sedangkan lebih dari 100 dokumen yang menjurus ke arah pembabitan tersebut telah diperolehi oleh Mahkamah Perancis,” ujarnya ketika berucap di Stadium Keladi, Kulim semalam.

Bercakap kepada lebih 15,000 hadirin, Anwar turut membidas media arus perdana yang cuba menyembunyikan kes melibatkan rasuah jutaan ringgit itu.

“Jangan kita harapkan keadilan media jika membabitkan kepimpinan Umno-BN walaupun jelas Najib mesti hadir ke sana,” tegasnya disambut sorakan hadirin yang mahu Najib segera menjawab cabaran tersebut.

Hadir sama dalam majlis itu Naib Presiden KEADILAN, N.Surendran, Setiausaha Agung, Datuk Saifuddin Nasution Ismail, Exco Kerajaan Kedah, Datuk S.Manikumar dan barisan kepimpinan PR Kedah.

Baru-baru ini, laman web Asia Sentinel memuatnaik 153 dokumen siasatan polis Perancis, yang mendedahkan urusniaga Scorpene membabitkan kerajaan Malaysia dan syarikat pertahanan Perancis, DCNS.

Ia susulan penafian menteri pertahanan, Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi bahawa kerajaan tiada maklumat mengenai jualan rahsia pertahanan negara dan transaksi Scorpene dibuat mengikut peraturan.

Kes Scorpene melibatkan komisen ratusan juta ringgit itu difailkan Suara Rakyat Malaysia (Suaram) dan memasuki peringkat perbicaraan di Mahkamah Tinggi Perancis (Tribunal de Grande Instance) sejak Mac lalu.

1 July 2012

Pendapat

Pendapat Anda?

Switch to our mobile site